Services computing

Services Computing has become a cross-discipline that covers the science and technology of bridging the gap between business services and IT services. The underneath breaking technology suite includes Web services and service-oriented architecture (SOA), cloud computing, business consulting methodology and utilities, business process modeling, transformation and integration. This scope of Services Computing covers the whole life-cycle of services innovation research that includes business componentization, services modeling, services creation, services realization, services annotation, services deployment, services discovery, services composition, services delivery, service-to-service collaboration, services monitoring, services optimization, as well as services management. The goal of Services Computing is to enable IT services and computing technology to perform business services more efficiently and effectively.

Computer Support Services, Inc., or CSSI, is a multi-national company providing technology solutions and professional services. The company is best known for releasing CoreIntegrator Workflow, a Workflow/Business Process Management (BPM) technology suite. Computer Support Services, Inc. (CSSI) is a Microsoft Silver Certified Partner and a re-seller of Microsoft Dynamics GP, formerly known as Great Plains, a Platinum Partner of Intermec and a Gold Partner of Motorola Solutions providing supply chain solutions CSSI headquarters is located in Lewisburg, Pennsylvania, along with offices in Pittsburgh and Wyomissing. CSSI is the parent company of CSSI Global Technologies located in Bangalore, India. In 2007, Inc. 5000 awards recognized CSSI as one of the top 5,000 fastest growing companies in the United States.

In telecommunication, a telecommunications service is a service provided by a telecommunications provider, or a specified set of user-information transfer capabilities provided to a group of users by a telecommunications system. The telecommunications service user is responsible for the information content of the message. The telecommunications service provider has the responsibility for the acceptance, transmission, and delivery of the message. For purposes of regulation by the Federal Communications Commission under the U.S. Communications Act of 1934 and Telecommunications Act of 1996, the definition of telecommunications service is “the offering of telecommunications for a fee directly to the public, or to such classes of users as to be effectively available directly to the public, regardless of the facilities used.” Telecommunications, in turn, is defined as “the transmission, between or among points specified by the user, of information of the user’s choosing, without change in the form or content of the information as sent and received.”

In computer networking, a network service is an application running at the network application layer and above, that provides data storage, manipulation, presentation, communication or other capability which is often implemented using a client-server or peer-to-peer architecture based on application layer network protocols. Each service is usually provided by a server component running on one or more computers (often a dedicated server computer offering multiple services) and accessed via a network by client components running on other devices. However, the client and server components can both be run on the same machine. Clients and servers will often have a user interface, and sometimes other hardware associated with it.

In computer network programming, the application layer is an abstraction layer reserved for communications protocols and methods designed for process-to-process communications across an Internet Protocol (IP) computer network. Application layer protocols use the underlying transport layer protocols to establish host-to-host connections for network services.

TCP-IP network services

Port numbers

Many Internet Protocol-based services are associated with a particular well-known port number which is standardized by the Internet technical governance. For example, World-Wide-Web servers operate on port 80, and email relay servers usually listen on port 25.

TCP versus UDP

Different services use different packet transmission techniques. In general, packets that must get through in the correct order, without loss, use TCP, whereas real time services where later packets are more important than older packets use UDP. For example, file transfer requires complete accuracy and so is normally done using TCP, and audio conferencing is frequently done via UDP, where momentary glitches may not be noticed. UDP lacks built-in network congestion avoidance and the protocols that use it must be extremely carefully designed to prevent network collapse.